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London Pubs: Architecture Galore

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While out and about capturing gardens and green scenes in London, I kept finding myself chancing upon one pub after another. Yes, they are ubiquitous in this British metropolis but my fascination was more with their charming (dare I say “quaint”) architecture.

Before I knew it, I was adding pub images to my cell phone. Something that is so identified with and so much a  part of a culture deserves to be documented. And furthermore, in a city of such architectural significance, the London pub facades are singular, with a personality all their own. I couldn’t resist! (P.S. I can’t speak for the interiors) Just the names alone are worth the read…Bag O’ Nails anyone?

As the seventeenth century diarist, Samuel Pepys, observed, pubs “are the heart of England.”

The Orange

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Brandies

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Fox & Anchor

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Two Chairmen

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Bag O’ Nails

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Windsor Castle

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The Albert

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And its other three floors.

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The Grenadier

A bit one-off from the more formal facades, but I was encouraged to include The Grenadier because it is one of the oldest pubs in London (one can guess that the enthusiastic British flag colors were not a part of the original edifice).

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Which is your favorite?

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5 thoughts on “London Pubs: Architecture Galore

  1. Bettie: The word “pub” always seemed to me to signify a cozy, snug and low key sort of place. Never one that exemplified any great architectural façade. You have opened up my eyes to the many pubs that are housed in architectural gems. Always nice to start one’s day learning something new!

  2. The Grenadier… it was our local pub just round the corner when living in Lennox Gardens we would stop off there at the end of the day. There was also the Admiral Cod (Codrington) which we frequented.
    Another favourite was The Australian. Then in Chiswick there was the City Barge a great favourite on Sunday mornings. About twice a year the Thames would rise up to the storm doors, covering the path and if it was not closing time one would see people sitting in the trees, males in their sweaters and cravats, nonchalantly reading the Sunday Times or Observer and having their beers passed through the storm door.
    Thank you again Bettie – nostalgia reigns.

  3. Always enjoy your interesting blogs !
    I’m adding ‘pubs’ to my iphone for our
    next European Adventure. ❤

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