Design & Décor, Living with Style, The Newport Diary


The Virtues of Autumn Clematis

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Autumn is rather limited in the variety of plants that are still blooming now. But one, ‘clematis paniculata,’ or ‘Autumn Clematis,’ puts all others to shame with her fresh lime green buds that open to a beguiling five-petaled white star that grows in vast abundance.

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This enthusiastic spirit (enveloping might be another word) is evident as she rambles and gambols over anything in her path. One can easily forgive her “wanton” ways, though, when you view just how dreamy and romantic she makes everything look.

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A dear friend’s small “library” on his Newport property is such a perfect and elegant example.

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After a long, late hot summer, when gardens are starting to look a bit ragged at the edges, along she comes to the rescue.

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Another name she answers to is ‘Bridal Veil.’ Can’t you guess why?

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If not already, I hope you’re now awakened to the possibilities of what the ‘Autumn Clematis’ can add to a spot in your garden.

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At Parterre, she is just starting to wrap and drape herself around the pergola columns…just in time for a (virtual) baby shower.

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Doesn’t everyone need a ‘Bridal Veil’?

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All photos credit, Julie Grant.

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Bettie Bearden Pardee

About Bettie Bearden Pardee

Author of Private Newport and Living Newport, garden furniture designer (The Parterre Bench), national lecturer, and entertaining expert. An honoree for the second year on "The Salonniere 100 America's Best Party Hosts", she was also the host and creative producer of "The Presidential Palate: Entertaining at the White House".

7 thoughts on “The Virtues of Autumn Clematis

      1. I’ve had Autumn Clematis for years and tried to get rid of it for even longer! Wish you would have mentioned the trick of not having it spread throughout the garden is to cut off the seed heads as soon as it stops blooming. It’s even coming up in my lawn 2 years after taking it off the fence!

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